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Friday, May 09, 2003  

sketch three

She drove to the farmer's market alone, but happy. It was an unusually hot, humid morning for so early in May, but she'd decided to get out, lest she spend all day without leaving her small apartment. The farmer's market was only a few blocks down the road in the city's downtown center: a straggle of fruit, preserves and flower vendors along one side of a single block. Still, it was the best produce in town -- ripe tomatoes, heaps of peppers and, at one end, a man with an ex-dry wall compound bucket full of long-stem roses (never red).

The morning was bearing toward noon and some of the vendors, more willing to take their leftovers home for canning than sacrifice them in the building heat, were packing their crates and baskets back into the small pickups they had driven onto the sidewalk. The flower man was still at his corner, offering three creamy, ivory roses for $1. She jumped at the chance, for what graduate student could afford to buy a dozen roses for herself, sans special occasion? He carefully wrapped the dripping flowers in newspaper (yesterday's Courier-Star) and handed her the bundle. The girl left without another purchase save the roses, and, once at home, trimmed the stems under running water as she'd been taught. She placed them into a curvy glass vase on her desk, which took up an entire wall of the small living room. They were spectacular -- twelve ivory roses, accidentally fanned into an arrangement that would please a seasoned professional.

For two weeks -- fourteen days -- the cream roses thrived in their vase on the tiny apartment's desk. Having plenty of other things on her mind -- affording the summer's tuition, for one -- she would occasionally forget about the flowers. These moments were the best -- when, then glancing around the room from her spot on the sofa, she would see them, and start, and remember. She would sigh, and stare for a moment, smiling at her $4 roses.

posted by elle | Friday, May 09, 2003 |


Thursday, May 08, 2003  

The music store

After 4 hours of downloading the requisite program updates, I finally made it into the iTunes Music Store last night around 10:00 p.m. I own an iPod and an iBook, so I am pretty well equipped for the iTunes experience. I had fun shopping, purchasing mostly softer songs from the 1970s, including a couple from the Bee-Gees (woo-hoo!). I spent $17.82 on 18 songs, which is nothing compared to what I would have spent to purchase the 15 or so albums on which those songs are contained.

Note to music industry execs: I would not have purchased those 15 albums to get the individual songs, so be glad you're getting my $17.82.

My thoughts? I'll definitely be going back. I don't have the concerns about AAC formatting or copy protection that others have mentioned; the music is solely for use on my iPod, as my car doesn't handle homemade CDs terribly well. Frankly, I'm happy just to have a safe, legal environment in which to purchase cheap songs. And, since my music selections are so old and unpopular that they've all made it onto babyboomer Time/Life compilations, I found almost everything I was looking for. Downloads are incredibly slow, but if you shop first and download later, you can let your Apple do the downloading while you snooze away the night. That said, I have a few helpful hints to pass along to future users:

1. In order to participate in select-first-and-purchase-later shopping, you need to set your iTunes preferences to make purchases via *shopping cart* instead of one-click shopping. One-click purchasing is the default option in iTunes, so you'll need to make this change unless you only plan on buying one song per music store visit. Without the shopping cart, you'll be stuck waiting for an entire song to download (at least 20 minutes on 56K) before you can browse again, as the song sucks up so much bandwith other browsing/surfing is virtually impossible. So, browse first, build your shopping cart second and purchase en masse last.

2. Songs download faster in the morning (7:00 a.m.) than they do in the evening (11:00 - 1:00 p.m.).

3. Turn off your screensaver and any power saving functions you might have. Your 'puter will need the time to download your selections. However, if your computer's modem times out or you forget to turn off your sleep function (as I did last night), you can resume a download later. I'm not sure how well this works if a selection is mid-song when the downloading stops, but it works fine within a list of selections. Connect to the internet and use the iTunes "check for downloaded songs" function. It will continue to download whatever songs you purchased, but hadn't received, during your last store visit.

I suppose that's all. Happy surfing!

posted by elle | Thursday, May 08, 2003 |
 

Applet

Make your fish happy with a nice, cozy (albeit rather dark) macquarium.

Make your liable happy with a shiny, happy apple lunch box.

posted by elle | Thursday, May 08, 2003 |


Tuesday, May 06, 2003  

artfix redux

More sketchbooks.
. Jonathan Keegan
. from the Archives of American Art
. Paul Antonson

posted by elle | Tuesday, May 06, 2003 |
 

Temporary venting

As per my note, this post has been deleted. Although I would note that things involving the subject of the post actually got *worse* yesterday. Let's say a good, solid chunk of hypocrisy entered into it...

-- the mgmt.

posted by elle | Tuesday, May 06, 2003 |


Monday, May 05, 2003  

get yer art fix here

Handicrafts.
There are many incredibly talented gals out there selling their handicrafted wares online. A sample of their sites/shops are linked below.

. tinymonkey cards
. blissen
. cut + paste
. crackers and honey

I ordered one of these magnets today.

Magnets.
Speaking of magnets, marble magnets make a great little craft project, and notmartha explains how. PaperSource offers similar directions for their picture pebbles.

Personal art.
. notkeren's sketchbook link from erica
. collagetown gallery link from reen


posted by elle | Monday, May 05, 2003 |
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